Manifest Identity & Logo Design

on October 19th, 2010

Arabesque Logo Design
Brand identity work for an executive coaching firm in Sydney.

Concept One: Arabesque Lettering

Simple, elegant

Arabesque designs, islimi in Persian, do not aim to imitate the plant kingdom but to distill visually the essence of rhythm and growth it manifests, recalling the archetypal Gardens of Paradise. A core component of the arabesque style, the spirals are primordial and cross-cultural symbols of growth and evolution, intimately related to life and its cycles. They embody the eddying process of Creation’s expansion and contraction and find their application in many designs around the world..

The spiral is associated worldwide with the sun and its yearly cycle. The sun unwinds from its rebirth at the winter solstice, loops ever more widely in the sky, past the balance points of the equinox to the summer solstice, when it is sky-borne for the longest period in its cycle, before winding back up to its winter demise.

The arabesque motifs become therefore – with their spirals charged of symbolism and leaves to illustrate growth – an ideal representation for Manifest’s philosophy of assisting personal growth and evolution in their clients. And for a bonus point, if you look really carefully there’s a butterfly hidden in the centre, another universal symbol of transformation.

Arabesque Logo Design
Arabesque Logo Design
Arabesque Logo Design
Arabesque Logo Design
Arabesque Logo Design
Arabesque Logo Design
Arabesque Logo Design
Arabesque Logo Design
Arabesque Logo Design
Arabesque Logo Design
Arabesque Logo Design
Arabesque Logo Design
Arabesque Logo Design
Arabesque Logo Design
Arabesque Logo Design

Concept Two: Geometrical Rosettes

Playful, colourful

A prevalent device in Islamic geometric patterns is the distinctive geometric rosette, with its petals arranged around a central star like an archetypal crystalline flower. Rosette patterns such as these can also be seen as a network of stellar motifs, inverting perception to picture petals as negative space. Many different techniques have been used throughout the Islamic world, adding practical aids such as grids and stencil to the traditional use of the compass and straight edge. However, the concept below is based on the most basic of the rosettes, the star and six.

But first things first: consider a point, dimensionless in space; extending the point defines a line. Turning the span of this line about the first point traces a circle, the first and the simplest geometric plane figure and Unity’s perfect symbol. Mark a second circle, centred on the circumference of the first and passing through its centre. Continue by placing circles at each new intersection to fit six identical circles cycling around a central one, the ideal representation of the six days of creation. Now duplicate and rotate the resulting pattern through one twelfth of a full turn.

This is the structure that formed the basis of this concept. The shape the rosette has been morphed into is again the butterfly, universal symbol of evolution. The colour palette is based on not only Arabic tiling, but also a combination frequently encountered in nature (think underwater photography). And if you squint a little, you may distinguish the shape of an M in the turquoise tiles.

Geometric Butterfly Logo Design
Geometric Butterfly  Logo Design
Geometric Butterfly  Logo esign
Geometric Butterfly  Log Design
Geometric Butterfly  Logo Design
Geometric Butterfly  Logo Design
Geometric Butterfly  Logo Design
Geometric Butterfly  LogoDesign
Geometric Butterfly  Logo Design
Geometric Butterfly  Logo Design
Geometric Butterfly  Logo Design
Geometric Butterfly  Logo Design

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