Copywriting for social media

on November 3rd, 2008

Do forgive me this brief rant, I just came out of yet another meeting I tried to explain blogging and mcroblogging to corporate types. Exhausting.

For some reason, it seems very difficult for the corporate world to relate to social media. It’s a little like trying to convert a B2B marketer to B2C: whatever they do, they can’t seem to be able to kick the habit of thinking in corporate lingo.

Talking to consumers, to individuals, requires a very different language, a very different tone of voice. Making your message heard in the social media world requires a very similar one, more personal, more genuine. Devoid of ‘framework’ thinking and buzzwords and more genuine. A language which allows the person writing the piece to show through.

The same challenge seems to apply to any effort of converting corporate people to take up Twitter. And I would know, I used to be one of the said corporate crowd. Most of my friends still are.

I think I’ll write a Beginner’s Guide to Twitter one of these days. In an attempt to marry up the two very different worlds. I’ll have to include a few frameworks in there, for the MBA-qualified mob, and a few 140 character pieces of wisdom.

But until I do, I thought I would list a few good resources to get anyone started with writing for social media:

And stay tuned for that Twitter Guide, should have something in about a week’s time.

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7 Responses to “Copywriting for social media”

  1. limeshot says:

    I agree you CAN measure the effectiveness for DM campaigns – it’s not rocket science to use a custom phone number, email address or tracking ID; but people usually don’t, which I find mind blowing.

    I’m sure you can actually measure the success of various social media campaigns – same little trick, custom tracking IDs. But the problem is the long period of relationship – building that’s required before actually obtaining any benefits (and I’m thinking primarily Twitter). And that’s impossible to quantify.

    Love the concept of “assumptions” – reminds me of my MBA days when the statistics lecturer took on data set and using two different sets of assumptions proved two diametrically different hypothesis. That was when I stopped believing in research and statistics (which I still love, since it allows me to prove virtually anything :))

  2. Nicky says:

    Ya, I would say that’s the case for a lot of mass advertising and branding campaigns.

    However, if done properly and using the correct metrics you can measure the projected response of direct mail, particularly Direct Response mail campaigns conversions. You can even measure success of some types of ad campaigns. I think you can do the same with social media tools, just that the case hasn’t been fully made yet. I know that if I was asking for money/resources to do marketing stuff I always had to make a business case for it and show what I expected in terms of revenue and profits. And then I had to track it. The word “assumptions” is a wonderful word in marketing.

    Nicky´s last blog post: Expressing the ROI of Social Media. Uphill Battle or No-Brainer? site: [site]

  3. limeshot says:

    “They need to be able to translate the benefits directly to the numbers… not a very easy thing.” you say.

    And yet, if you think of the huge budgets allocated to ‘traditional’ marketing, who can put a dollar value against say bus wraps or ‘branding campaigns’ or even direct mail campaigns?

  4. Nicky says:

    Limeshot – thank you for the mention.

    “The same challenge seems to apply to any effort of converting corporate people to take up Twitter.”

    It’s indeed a challenge. Things that seem really obvious to consumers (and small businesses) take on a different dimension for corporations. But they do have many hoops to jump through. They need to be able to translate the benefits directly to the numbers… not a very easy thing.

    Nicky´s last blog post: Expressing the ROI of Social Media. Uphill Battle or No-Brainer? site: [site]

  5. limeshot says:

    Hi Neal, thanks for stopping by; love the avatar by the way :)

  6. Thanks for the mention! I hope my articles can be helpful to your readers.

    Neal “thePuck” Jansons´s last blog post: Three Strategies for Success in New Media site: [site]

  7. Tertius says:

    Something I’m going to try as being focused on the every day business person instead of the MBA crowd.

    I’m trying!

    Tertius´s last blog post: Getting website maintenance done… With a plan site: [site]